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diet

  • Fresh veggies and fancy extra virgin olive oil are cheaper than even the cheapest USDA-recommended diet

    Fresh veggies and fancy extra virgin olive oil are cheaper than even the cheapest USDA-recommended diet | iloveaceite news | photo by @gastromedia Fresh veggies and fancy extra virgin olive oil are cheaper than even the cheapest USDA-recommended diet | iloveaceite news | photo by @gastromedia

    A new study out of the Miriam Hospital and the Rhode Island Community Food Bank says that fresh veggies and fancy extra virgin olive oil are cheaper than even the cheapest USDA-recommended diet.

    The study showed almost miraculous results, although none of them will be surprising for a native of countries like Spain and Italy, where such diets are still typical. Recipes were developed by Flynn at the Miriam Hospital, in collaboration with the Rhode Island Community Food Bank. These were based on "plant-based olive oil diet recipes," and clients of the Food Bank were asked to use these recipes three times a week (they actually averaged 2.8 times a week).

    A diet based on fresh fruit and vegetables, along with extra-virgin olive oil, is perceived by consumers as an expensive option, but the reverse is true: a Mediterranean-style diet costs around $750 per person less per year than the USDA’s cheapest healthy recommendations.

    "Extra-virgin olive oil is also thought to be expensive," says lead author Mary Flynn, "but we suspected it was meat that made a diet expensive, and extra-virgin olive oil is cheaper than even small amounts of meat. We expected the two diets to be similar in fruit and vegetable content, but our plant-based diet was substantially cheaper, and featured a lot more fruits and vegetables and whole grains."

    Source: co.exist

    Photo by gastromedia

  • Fry with extra virgin olive oil increases the antioxidants in fresh vegetables

    Fry with extra virgin olive oil increases the antioxidants in fresh vegetables Fry with extra virgin olive oil increases the antioxidants in fresh vegetables

    Investigators of the University of Granada have shown that frying in extra virgin olive oil is the cooking technique that more increases the phenolic fraction of fresh vegetables included in the Mediterranean diet (potato, pumpkin, tomato and eggplant), which is a improving these foods in the cooking process.

    This is because phenols transfer occurs from the extra virgin olive oil to vegetables, enriching them with exclusive oil phenolic compounds which are not naturally present in fresh vegetables.

    According to the results of the doctoral thesis of Pilar Ramirez Jessica Anaya, under doctoral advisors Cristina Sanchez Samaniego, Marina Mir Villalón and Herminia López-García de la Serrana, in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, (Faculty of Pharmacy) at the University of Granada, it can say that frying in extra virgin olive oil is the technique that produces greater increases associated phenols antioxidants whose consumption prevents chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, diabetes or macular degeneration.

    Extra virgin Olive oil is ideal for frying. In proper temperature conditions, without over-heating, it undergoes no substantial structural change and keeps its nutritional value better than other oils, not only because of the antioxidants but also due to its high levels of oleic acid. Its high smoking point (210ºC) is substantially higher than the ideal temperature for frying food (180ºC). Those fats with lower critical points, such as corn and butter, break down at this temperature and form toxic products.

    Another advantage of using extra virgin olive oil for frying is that it forms a crust on the surface of the food that impedes the penetration of oil and improves its flavour. Food fried in extra virgin olive oil has a lower fat content than food fried in other oils, making extra virgin olive oil more suitable for weight control. Extra virgin olive oil, therefore, is the most suitable, the lightest and the tastiest medium for frying.

  • Extra virgin olive oil use is associated with improved post-prandial blood glucose and LDL cholesterol in healthy subjects

    Extra virgin olive oil use is associated with improved post-prandial blood glucose and LDL cholesterol in healthy subjects Extra virgin olive oil use is associated with improved post-prandial blood glucose and LDL cholesterol in healthy subjects

    Objectives: Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and seems to account for the protective effect against cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism is still elusive.

    Design: We tested the effect of extra virgin olive oil, added to Mediterranean-type meal, on post-prandial glycemic and lipid profile.

    Subjects: Post-prandial glycemic and lipid profile were investigated in 25 healthy subjects who were randomly allocated in a cross-over design to a Mediterranean-type meal added with or without 10 g extra virgin olive oil (first study), or Mediterranean-type meal with extra virgin olive oil (10 g) or corn oil (10 g; second study). Glycemic profile, which included glucose, insulin, dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) protein and activity, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and lipid profile, which included, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (LDL-C), oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C), were analyzed before and 2 h after the meal.

    Results: In the first study, 2 h after meal, subjects who assumed a meal with extra virgin olive oil had significantly lower blood glucose (P<0.001), DPP-4 protein (P<0.001) and activity (P<0.001), LDL-C (P<0.001) and ox-LDL (P<0.001) and higher insulin (P<0.05), GLP-1 (P<0.001) and GIP (P<0.05) compared with those without extra virgin olive oil. The second study showed that compared with corn oil, extra virgin olive oil improved both glycemic and lipid profile. Thus, a significantly smaller increase of glucose (P<0.05), DPP4 protein (P<0.001) and activity (P<0.05) and higher increase of insulin (P<0.001) and GLP-1 (P<0.001) were observed. Furthermore, compared with corn oil, EVOO showed a significantly less increase of LDL-C (P<0.05) and ox-LDL (P<0.001).

    Conclusions: We report for the first time that extra virgin olive oil improves post-prandial glucose and LDL-C, an effect that may account for the antiatherosclerotic effect of the Mediterranean diet.

    Resource: nature.com 

    Read all study at Nutrition & Diabetes (2015) 5, e172; doi:10.1038/nutd.2015.23 Published online 20 July 2015

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